August 29, 2016

Clips & Tips: DOGSO inside the penalty area

The following video clip collection focuses on the topic "Denying an Obvious Goal-Scoring Opportunity" (DOGSO) inside the penalty area. Since the IFAB's revision of Law 12, the difference between DOGSO offences outside and inside the penalty area is crucial and mainly determines the disciplinary sanction.


Theory

The following wording applies:

"Where a player denies the opposing team a goal or an obvious goal-scoring opportunity by a deliberate handball offence the player is sent off wherever the offence occurs.

Where a player commits an offence against an opponent within their own penalty area which denies an opponent an obvious goal-scoring opportunity and the referee awards a penalty kick, the offending player is cautioned unless:

• The offence is holding, pulling or pushing or
• The offending player does not attempt to play the ball or there is no possibility for the player making the challenge to play the ball or
• The offence is one which is punishable by a red card wherever it occurs on the field of play (e.g. serious foul play, violent conduct etc.)

In all the above circumstances the player is sent off.

The following must be considered:

• distance between the offence and the goal
• general direction of the play
• likelihood of keeping or gaining control of the ball
• location and number of defenders"

The exception "does not attempt to play the ball" sounds easier than it is. Although it is not clearly written down in the Laws of the Game, attempting to play the ball should be understood like a general attempt to play / get the ball with focus on the ball.


What does this mean?

• Referees still have to identify whether an obvious goal-scoring opportunity was denied at all.

• Like before, they have to identify the exact position of the offence.

• From now on, the position of the offence does not only determine the match sanction (free-kick or penalty kick) though, but also the disciplinary sanction (yellow cards for DOGSO-offences inside the penalty area with the exceptions listed above; red cards for DOGSO-offences outside the penalty area). Special attention is needed.

• Therefore it is fundamentally important to first be sure where the offence took place and then, based on that, deciding on the disciplinary sanction. Doing that vice versa is impossible given the new LotG.

Referee instructors should focus on the following three aspects in future:

• Training referees in accurately identifying situations where an obvious goal-scoring opportunity
  was denied

• Sensitizing referees and particularly assistant referees for identifying the position of the offence

• Training them in judging whether the offence has been one that leads to a red card even if the
   offence has been inside the penalty area (see above)

This decision-tree might help you to get a systematical overview on the considerations to make when judging DOGSO offences from 1st July 2016 on.




Praxis

The following situations focus on offences inside the penalty area. For DOGSO cases outside the penalty area, please have a look into this post (it is recommended that you check it first).


https://vimeo.com/album/4089856/video/178506380

While attempting to play the ball, the defender carelessly trips his opponent and thus denies an obvious goal-scoring opportunity (if there was no foul, the attacker would most likely have no problems to score the goal).

As in this clip the defender clearly attempts to play the ball and also has the possibility to do so - or in other words (this will be important in the other videos!):

He clearly focuses on playing the ball and does NOT primarily focus on the opponent - the defender should be cautioned with a yellow card and NOT with a red card as it has been the case in the past years.
https://vimeo.com/album/4089856/video/178475750

The defender trips his opponent on the way to the goal with no other defender being able to intervene. In attempt to play the ball, he thus denies an obvious goal-scoring opportunity. A yellow card should be given.

In general, defenders who clearly attempt to get the ball and focus on the ball when making their challenge (even if they make a foul), should get a yellow card if there DOGSO-offence is not holding, pulling, pushing, a deliberate handball or a foul which is penalized by a red card everywhere on the field.
https://vimeo.com/album/4089856/video/178476019

In attempt to play the ball, the defender comes a short but important moment too late and unfairly denies an obvious goal-scoring opportunity. He should receive a yellow card. Referees are reminded to integrate the possibility to play the ball and specially the following consideration into their judgment: Does the offending defender focus on the ball or on his opponent?

a) Focus on the ball: Yellow Card.
b) Focus on the opponent: Red Card.

This clip also shows that from different angles the question above might lead to different answers and implications (from behind it looks as if the ball was already "miles away").

https://vimeo.com/album/4089856/video/178498255

The defender unfairly stops the attacker who is having an obvious goal-scoring opportunity in front of the goalkeeper with no other defender being able to intervene. Although the challenge looks quite opponent-focussed and rather reckless at first glance, the replays clearly show that the defender's action is an attempt to play the ball. It is, however, mistimed so that the defender came a part of a second too late. Referees are encouraged to pay special attention to the moment of when the defending action starts. If in that moment the defender has the possibility and shows an attempt as well as the intent to play the ball, he should be yellow-carded - even if the defender concerned comes too late as he did in this video. But still, he tried to get the ball, and so a yellow card should be given!
https://vimeo.com/album/4089856/video/180185279

Similar to the previous video, the defender's action might look opponent-focussed at first glance. However, he clearly attempts to play and clear the ball with his right foot, but makes unfair contact with the attacker.

The left foot causes a 2nd contact (rather in the same defending action). 
As the defending action as a whole rather is an attempt to play, clear and get the ball, a yellow card should be issued.
If, however, the referee deems the 2nd contact as a new challenge without any chance to play the ball (or even as a violent conduct), he has to send him off.
Recommendation: Yellow Card

https://vimeo.com/album/4089856/video/179881317

There is no doubt that the defender's offence clearly denies an obvious goal-scoring opportunity. 
The foul is a clear attempt to play and get the ball, too.

But is it inside the penalty area? Replays from the side rather suggest the answer "No". This clip therefore highlights the importance of accurate information provided by the assistant referees in terms of whether the potential DOGSO-offence occurred outside or inside of the penalty area. This has immediate effects on the disciplinary sanction:

Inside = Yellow, Outside = Red.
https://vimeo.com/album/4089856/video/99237252


The defending player carelessly trips his opponent who is facing the goalkeeper in a 1v1-situation with no other defender being able to intervene. He therefore clearly denies an obvious goal-scoring opportunity.
If the referee has the opinion that in this concrete situation there has been no real possibility to play the ball and as the defender has not clearly attempted to play the ball via his defending action either (he shows no interest for the ball but only crosses the attacker's running path), a red card should be issued in line with the revised Law 12. 
If the referee however deems the action of the defender as attempt to play or get the ball, then he should only caution him.
Recommendation: Red Card.

https://vimeo.com/album/4089856/video/178485100


The defending player prevents the attacking player from easily scoring the ball into the empty goal by pushing him in his back (clear DOGSO / DOG). As the offence is "pushing", the offending player should be sent off with a red card in accordance with Law 12. 

Referees should be reminded on ...
a) conveying a composed, calm image even in crucial moments while maintaining authority and confidence (therefore it would be better to stay still instead of running around in the penalty area - conveys more determination)
b) consistently dealing with mobbing and/or players blatantly demanding cards against opponents and
c) not raising a card against an offending player while he is still lying on the ground (signals a lack of respect and might seem arrogant).

https://vimeo.com/album/4089856/video/178485099


The defender blatantly holds his opponent and thus prevents him from pulling off a shot towards / into the goal. A clear and obvious goal-scoring opportunity is thus denied. 
As the offence is a mixture of "pulling" and "holding", a red card must be issued - no room for interpretation.

In general, the referee should consider to communicate his disciplinary decision more quickly. Isolating players when issuing cards against them is correct - 20 seconds between sorting the card out and raising it a bit too much though. Referees should be careful about touching or even slightly pushing players, too.
https://vimeo.com/album/4089856/video/178500948


The defender clearly holds the opponent. If there had been no holding offence, the attacking player would have faced the goal and the goalkeeper with no other defenders being close enough to intervene. 

He therefore denies an obvious goal-scoring opportunity. 

The referee has well freezed the exact moment of the offence in his mind and, thanks to that, comes to the right decision.

As the offence is "holding", the defender has to be sent off with a red card.

https://vimeo.com/album/4089856/video/178487872

1: The ball is passed from the right penalty side and is very well-timed. The defender in the middle clearly holds his opponent. Although the attacking player in the middle of the penalty area has (logically) no control of the ball (as it is passed to him), the likelihood that he easily controls the ball and scores a goal is very high - he only has to touch it and a goal would be scored quite probably. The action of the defender therefore denies an obvious goal-scoring opportunity. As the offence is "holding", the defender needs to be sent off with a red card. Referees are reminded to share responsibilities with their teammates in clear pre-match-briefings.

2: This situation is more difficult as it is less clear whether the attacker would be able to easily control the ball if there was no foul. This concrete constellation of a moderately high pass and a volley shot onto the goal can either result in a fantastic goal, in a shot reaching the sky or in not reaching the ball at all. Only technically adapt players are able to control such a type of pass.
For this reason, there is a likelihood that a player of Aguero's format can score a goal from such a lob. Generally and on amateur level, this is rather unprobable though. If, in the opinion of the referee, the holding nonetheless denies an obvious goal-scoring opportunity (since the attacker would be most likely at the right place if there was no foul), he has to send the defender off. If, in his opinion, it is not clear enough whether this is an obvious goal-scoring opportunity, he should only caution for defender for stopping a promising attack. A grey area situation.

The unifying message behind both clips however is: If you deem an action as DOGSO and if the offence must be classified as "holding", then you have to send the offender off with a red card.


https://youtu.be/tDpx9GGH79I?t=197


Denying a goal must be punished with a red card.

Denying an obvious goal-scoring opportunity by a deliberate handball has to be penalized with a red card at all times and everywhere - inside and outside the penalty area.
https://vimeo.com/album/4089856/video/178502802

The defender (A. Iniesta) deliberately handles the ball and thus prevents the attacker (A. Griezmann) from gaining possession of the ball in a very dangerous position.
Although the attacker still has to receive and control the ball to then pull off a shot on goal, it can be assumed that a player of this format is easily able to deal with the well-timed pass (if it had come through), so that it should be rather deemed as DOGSO. As deliberately handling the ball is one of the reasons for which you are sent off if the offence denies an obvious goal-scoring opportunity, the defender should be sent off with a red card.
If, in the opinion of the referee, there are sufficient arguments in favour of deeming it as a promising attack only (e.g. no control of the ball), he should only caution the defender. We strongly recommend to interpret this as DOGSO though.

https://vimeo.com/album/4089856/video/180564311

The goalkeeper tackles the attacking player who is having an obvious goal-scoring opportunity. 

He both has the possibility to play the ball and also attempts to do so. The defensive action as a whole is an attempt to reach the ball, too.

The referee should caution the goalkeeper (yellow card) for denying an obvious goal-scoring opportunity while attempting to play the ball.

https://vimeo.com/175742009

The goalkeeper tackles the attacking player who is having an obvious goal-scoring opportunity. 

He both has the possibility to play the ball and also attempts to do so. The defensive action as a whole is an attempt to reach the ball, too - he just comes a part of a second too late.

The referee correctly cautions the goalkeeper (yellow card) for denying an obvious goal-scoring opportunity while attempting to play the ball.

https://vimeo.com/album/4089856/video/178488662

In attempt to play the ball, the goalkeeper trips the attacking player who has been about to face an empty goal in case of no offence.

He should be therefore deemed to have denied an obvious goal-scoring opportunity. A yellow card has to be issued (reason: attempt to play the ball).

4 Comments:

  1. Many thanks for your efforts in putting together all of the clips, it must take a fair amount of time, Very informative!

    ReplyDelete
  2. thank you so much for this good informations !
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    ReplyDelete

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